life in the high desert

Livin' Life , gettin' both feet wet, loving life in the High Desert of Arizona ......


http://potterybyjohnfoster.tumblr.com/
Richard Bach
Messiah’s Handbook
Reminders for the Advanced Soul

Richard Bach
Messiah’s Handbook
Reminders for the Advanced Soul

Gil Elvgren

Gil Elvgren

Richard Bach
Messiah’s Handbook
Reminders for the Advanced Soul

Richard Bach

Messiah’s Handbook

Reminders for the Advanced Soul

Gil Elvgren

Gil Elvgren

I get a Dialy picture from a man here in Sedona , does alot of gliding , this is todays pic .
There are pros and cons with respect to the use of prescribed burns and managing naturally caused fires as though they are a prescribed burn. The low intensity fires are reputed to mimic what occurred before man began meddling in things and are an effort to keep the forest in a healthier state. There are also questions as to the toxicity of low intensity versus high intensity burns. In short each camp has its proponents and its critics … each camp will drag out its experts and studies to support their viewpoint and you can end up in discussions where you try to impeach the credibility of each other’s experts … not very productive.
 
Proponents of prescribed burns frequently cite health of the forest … proponents of alternative methods of dealing with the issues frequently cite the health of people and that is kind of where I come in on the topic.  The burn camp states that the incidence of more devastating fires are less likely, the other that there are frequently alternatives to fire … fire is however a much cheaper way to deal with the issue … is it for those whose health is compromised?  
 
Interestingly the same agency that issues the permits to the USFS to engage in and continue burns is also the same agency that bans you from enjoying a cigarette (1.5 grams of tobacco) in a restaurant at the bottom of Airport Mesa currently buried in smoke; the reason is one of health as it has become accepted that smoke (ing) is bad for your health. More to follow on the topic, but we should each study the facts and determine what we prioritize … and do we really have it right this time? Dunno!
 
At any rate, this is what it looked like at a little after six this morning from 16,000’. I decided to go higher just because I could and because I like the perspective from that altitude … next flight we’ll push 17,999’ MSL and return for wonderful sugar free vanilla lattes At New York Deli … provided we can find it in all the smoke.
 
This shot was taken from 16,000’ looking north and working from top left we have Sitgreaves Mtn. on extreme left and it is ablaze and smoking (sounds enjoyable), just above it and moving to the right is the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, pulling back in  a little is Kendrick peak, the San Francisco Peaks, Mt Elden, Sunset Crater and on and on.  Moving right going back up from the middle of the image you can see the airport and just below and to the right of that Cathedral Rocks. Above and left of the airport is Thunder Mountain and above that and to the right is Wilson Mountain and Oak Creek Canyon goes up from there up and into the Colorado Plateau. Smoke? Everywhere! 
 
Have a beautiful day today … when outside breathe … ditto inside. Share a smile with someone you meet today and take care
 
Cheers
 
Ted
 

I get a Dialy picture from a man here in Sedona , does alot of gliding , this is todays pic .

There are pros and cons with respect to the use of prescribed burns and managing naturally caused fires as though they are a prescribed burn. The low intensity fires are reputed to mimic what occurred before man began meddling in things and are an effort to keep the forest in a healthier state. There are also questions as to the toxicity of low intensity versus high intensity burns. In short each camp has its proponents and its critics … each camp will drag out its experts and studies to support their viewpoint and you can end up in discussions where you try to impeach the credibility of each other’s experts … not very productive.

 

Proponents of prescribed burns frequently cite health of the forest … proponents of alternative methods of dealing with the issues frequently cite the health of people and that is kind of where I come in on the topic.  The burn camp states that the incidence of more devastating fires are less likely, the other that there are frequently alternatives to fire … fire is however a much cheaper way to deal with the issue … is it for those whose health is compromised?  

 

Interestingly the same agency that issues the permits to the USFS to engage in and continue burns is also the same agency that bans you from enjoying a cigarette (1.5 grams of tobacco) in a restaurant at the bottom of Airport Mesa currently buried in smoke; the reason is one of health as it has become accepted that smoke (ing) is bad for your health. More to follow on the topic, but we should each study the facts and determine what we prioritize … and do we really have it right this time? Dunno!

 

At any rate, this is what it looked like at a little after six this morning from 16,000’. I decided to go higher just because I could and because I like the perspective from that altitude … next flight we’ll push 17,999’ MSL and return for wonderful sugar free vanilla lattes At New York Deli … provided we can find it in all the smoke.

 

This shot was taken from 16,000’ looking north and working from top left we have Sitgreaves Mtn. on extreme left and it is ablaze and smoking (sounds enjoyable), just above it and moving to the right is the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, pulling back in  a little is Kendrick peak, the San Francisco Peaks, Mt Elden, Sunset Crater and on and on.  Moving right going back up from the middle of the image you can see the airport and just below and to the right of that Cathedral Rocks. Above and left of the airport is Thunder Mountain and above that and to the right is Wilson Mountain and Oak Creek Canyon goes up from there up and into the Colorado Plateau. Smoke? Everywhere!

 

Have a beautiful day today … when outside breathe … ditto inside. Share a smile with someone you meet today and take care

 

Cheers

 

Ted

 

harvestheart:

Interesting facts about the Sonoran Desert:
The key to the Sonoran Desert’s climate is the amount of rainfall which falls. More rain falls on the Sonoran Desert than any other desert.
This is the hottest of North American deserts, but a distinctly bimodal rainfall pattern produces a high biological diversity.
The Sonoran Desert is home to 60 species of mammals, more than 350 kinds of birds, 20 amphibians, around 100 reptiles and over 2000 native species of plants.
It contains a variety of unique and endemic plants and animals, such as the Saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) and Organ Pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi).
When the desert is windy, the sand gets picked up and tossed around which creates a sand storm or if the wind is blowing in a certain kind of way, it creates a whirlwind or dust devil.
Water accumulated by the mountains drains into rivers that cross the desert, creating corridors of riparian vegetation even during dry times of the year.
Many plants not only survive, but thrive in the harsh conditions of the Sonoran Desert. Many have evolved to have specialized adaptations to the desert climate. The Sonoran Desert’s biseasonal rainfall pattern results in more plant species than in the other North America deserts. The Sonoran Desert includes plant genera and species from the agave family, palm family, cactus family, legume family, and numerous others.
The seasons are like any other. Spring is a time when flowers bloom if the winter and fall had enough rain that year. There is summer and in the summer it rains the most and that helps summer flowers grow. Then fall comes with a cooler breeze, which lets the deserts summer heat wear away. Winter brings snow to the mountains and cold air to the desert valley.

harvestheart:

Interesting facts about the Sonoran Desert:

  • The key to the Sonoran Desert’s climate is the amount of rainfall which falls. More rain falls on the Sonoran Desert than any other desert.
  • This is the hottest of North American deserts, but a distinctly bimodal rainfall pattern produces a high biological diversity.
  • The Sonoran Desert is home to 60 species of mammals, more than 350 kinds of birds, 20 amphibians, around 100 reptiles and over 2000 native species of plants.
  • It contains a variety of unique and endemic plants and animals, such as the Saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) and Organ Pipe cactus (Stenocereus thurberi).
  • When the desert is windy, the sand gets picked up and tossed around which creates a sand storm or if the wind is blowing in a certain kind of way, it creates a whirlwind or dust devil.
  • Water accumulated by the mountains drains into rivers that cross the desert, creating corridors of riparian vegetation even during dry times of the year.
  • Many plants not only survive, but thrive in the harsh conditions of the Sonoran Desert. Many have evolved to have specialized adaptations to the desert climate. The Sonoran Desert’s biseasonal rainfall pattern results in more plant species than in the other North America deserts. The Sonoran Desert includes plant genera and species from the agave family, palm family, cactus family, legume family, and numerous others.
  • The seasons are like any other. Spring is a time when flowers bloom if the winter and fall had enough rain that year. There is summer and in the summer it rains the most and that helps summer flowers grow. Then fall comes with a cooler breeze, which lets the deserts summer heat wear away. Winter brings snow to the mountains and cold air to the desert valley.
Richard Bach
Messiah’s Handbook
Reminders for the Advanced Soul

Richard Bach
Messiah’s Handbook
Reminders for the Advanced Soul

Gil Elvgren

Gil Elvgren